High School Students: Apply to AAJA’s J Camp!

AAJA’ers: Encourage, nurture and inspire the next generation of journalists by recommending they apply to the FREE, multicultural program that is J Camp!

AAJA’s signature training program for aspiring young journalists is geared toward high school freshmen, sophomores or juniors (who are at least 16 years old by July 30, 2010) who are interested or thinking about journalism as a career.

It is held the week before the annual convention. This year, the program will run from July 31 – August 4 at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

This program houses the students on the university campus while they receive hands-on training in writing, photography, broadcasting, online media, and reporting from professional journalists. The program comes at no cost to J-Campers thanks to the generous support of funders such as the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Bloomberg, Dow Jones Newspaper Fund; AAJA chapters (sponsoring and/or subsidizing a student from their region when one is chosen for the program); and also from individual members, such as Jennifer 8 Lee and AAJA Governing Board member, Frank Witsil.

J Camp scholarship includes return airfare, transportation, university housing, and access to some of the brightest and best media minds in the country.

DOWNLOAD AN APPLICATION!

Take a look at what past J Camp students had to say about this life-changing experience:

“What’s All the Hype About?”

“It Will Change Your Life”

“Who Will You Meet?  Connections of a Lifetime”

You can also visit us at AAJA J Camp Facebook.  For more information, go to AAJA or contact Nao Vang, AAJA National Student Programs Coordinator at (415) 346-2051 x102 or programs@aaja.org.  We look forward to hearing from you!

About Athima Chansanchai

Until the recent closure of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, I was a full-time reporter on the Life & Arts staff, covering local talent, trends and events. I am currently a regular contributor with MSNBC.com's Technolog and also produce/edit for the Technology & Science section. I am also writing and editing freelance projects, starting my own events-based web site and fielding consulting assignments. In 2009, I also founded a media strategy company, Tima Media. I began my journalism career more than a decade ago at the Village Voice in New York, right after going to grad school in journalism at Stanford. I moved to the mainstream newspaper world by joining The Baltimore Sun in 2000. (That's right, I have "Wire" cred.) There, I covered children's literature and general assignment features before plunging into the metro side of the newsroom. I covered police, courts and municipal government. Sensational murder trials, weather stories and animals on the loose in sub-rural Maryland became part of a daily routine that never lacked for excitement. Tropical Storm Isabel didn't even stop me, although it tried: I ran into a tree on the way to an assignment that impaled my windshield with a branch. Moving to Seattle in 2005 exposed me to the sub-cultures of the Pacific Northwest, where my city-driven news features have covered the return of the Roller Girls, parkour, local hip hop, a non-profit that takes the homeless off the street and into the kitchen and the Tacoma mall shooting. I am also on the National Board of Directors for the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA). View all posts by Athima Chansanchai →

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