Tag Archives: journalism

Justice fellow position open at Grist

Grist, a website for green news, is currently looking for a justice fellow to join the edit team.

The justice fellow will primarily cover equality issues within the environmental movement. Grist alum Brentin Mock has done model work in this field.

Candidates are likely early-career journalists. The justice fellow will also have the option to work remotely.

Here’s a link to the fellowship description and application requirements: grist.org/fellowships

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Communications specialist position with Public Health – Seattle & King County

Public Health — Seattle & King County currently has an opening for full-time public information officer:

Public Health – Seattle & King County is now taking applications for a full-time Public Information Officer to join their Communications Team. They’re looking for qualified candidates who are excited for the challenge of protecting and improving our community’s health in a dynamic landscape.

Public Health – Seattle & King County —  Communications Specialist III

The Communications Specialist III (CSIII) will serve as part of Public Health – Seattle & King County’s Communications Team, which is a unit of the Office of the Director. S/he will carry out a wide range of external and internal communications functions that support department-wide and program goals and activities aimed at protecting and improving the community’s health.

(more…)

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Fellowship opportunities with Grist.org

Grist is now accepting applications for their next class of fellows. The fellowship is a training and mentorship program for early-career journalists (most likely recent college grads, with some experience in publishing/media). The current deadline is March 30.

About the Grist Fellowship Program

The Grist Fellowship Program is an opportunity for early-career journalists to hone their skills at a national news outlet and deepen their knowledge of environmental issues. The fellowship offers exposure to the leading sustainability thinkers and theories of our time, real-world experience at a fast-paced news site, and the occasional scrumptious snacks.

For more information about the program, click here.

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Founders Scholarship winner Sandi Halimuddin: “I finally feel empowered and ready to take the next step”

 

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Sandi Halimuddin, left, and AAJA Seattle president Mai Hoang at the AAJA Scholarship and Awards gala, which was held during the convention.

Sandi Halimuddin, 22, graduated earlier this year from the University of Washington with a degree in journalism and international relations and previously interned at The Seattle Times and Seattle Weekly. Halimuddin was the recipient of the 2013 Founders Scholarship, which covered the cost of registration and travel for the 2013 AAJA National Convention in New York. In the coming weeks, Halimuddin will return to New York in the next month for an internship at the World Policy Journal

As part of her scholarship, Halimuddin shared her convention experience for AAJASeattle.org. 

When I first heard about the AAJA Convention in New York, I was terrified. While my mentor (former AAJA National President) Sharon Chan described the event as a fun networking and learning opportunity, the thought of shamelessly self-promoting myself in front of well-established people in the journalism industry made me nervous. As a recent grad looking for an entry-level reporting job, the career fair, workshops and networking events are excellent resources, if not a bit daunting. Luckily, AAJA Seattle chapter members gave me great advice on how to make the most out of the annual convention.

First, my mentors encouraged me to come prepared. In addition to preparing an elevator pitch, resumes, business cards and a website with clips, it’s important to do your homework on the companies at the career fair. Sharon encouraged me to do research on media companies, their notable work and current job openings. Speaking with recruiters at the career fair was easier and more meaningful when I showed knowledge of the company and asked specific questions. While working the career fair may not immediately lead to a job, I found that speaking with recruiters helped me gain a better understanding of what my goals and expectations are.

Second, my mentors recommended that I meet as many people as possible. At big events such as these it’s too easy to hide in the corner, tweeting at celebrities and friends. While I had my share of awkward moments standing in the middle of the room looking for someone to talk to, I found that reaching out to people is not as frightening as it seems. Most people at networking events are genuine, friendly and eager to speak with people who are equally as passionate about journalism. Developing connections with fellow convention attendees is a good strategy to establish your presence in the industry, find mentors and learn from people you respect. It’s also comforting to have fellow journalism friends to keep in touch with throughout and after the convention.

Finally, my mentors in the AAJA Seattle chapter insisted that I follow up with recruiters, editors and fellow journalists I met during the convention. While it might be hard to stand out in such a busy and well-attended convention, a prompt and thoughtful follow-up letter or email goes a long way. Even if there are no current job opportunities, showing initiative and establishing relationships with people in the industry can be helpful in the future.

While I was initially hesitant about attending the AAJA Convention, I’m so glad I went this year. I met a lot of wonderful, helpful people at the convention and gained more confidence navigating the professional world. I also now have a more realistic understanding of the possibilities in the journalism industry. Following the AAJA Convention, I finally feel empowered and ready to take the next step in shaping my writing career by moving to New York City this month.

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Defending press freedom for student journalists at WWU

To use a metaphor that sports writers may jibe me for: some of my peers at Western Washington University seem to view college not as the season opener to adult life, but as merely a scrimmage. “Sure, we’re doing the same things, but they don’t affect our record right now.”

It sounds implausible that members of the digital generation who document their lives on social networks would delude themselves that way. But let’s forget about Facebook’s bottomless memory and humor them for a moment, because they almost had a major impact on our school’s interpretation of the First Amendment.

On Oct. 26, the Student Senate at Western introduced a resolution that would have allowed sources to back-edit Western publications’ content. It proposed that students or alumni featured in a publication could, one to 10 years later, tell the publication to delete the content and wipe it from the online archives.

I’m guessing most people reading this are journalists. While you folks pick your jaws up off the floor or try to control your incredulous laughter, I’ll explain the reasoning behind the proposal. (more…)

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